Blueberries = Happiness

I believe one should start one’s day with a smidgen of bliss. I think it helps set the tone for what is to come.  I have discovered blueberries in a big way since coming to Vermont and this little jar is not only a jar of blueberry spread —— (and an excellent source of fiber as the label plainly shows) but is also a little jar of Happiness ~ yes, with a capital H.  Not a bowl full of the delicious little darlings, to be sure, but in a pinch and when one is out of the actual fruit ~ wonderful.  It will stay stocked in my fridge even after we trek to one of the pick-your-own farms close to town.

Blueberries. The little globes of blue are perfect. There is no other way to describe them. They are without flaw. Mother Earth outdid herself with the creation of these little jewels.  My personal goal for this week is to locate a bottle of Honey Wine with Blueberries ~ a mead made by Artesano’s, a winery down the road.  (http://www.artesanomead.com)  Their website says of the mead:

“Blueberries contribute an amazing amount of character and depth to mead. The soft tannins and high acidity add a complexity that will enchant your taste buds. This vibrantly colored mead, made from five varieties of Vermont grown blueberries and pure raw honey, pairs well with white meat, grilled vegetables or a fresh spinach salad.”

Just the word mead sounds magical to me, and then add the word blueberry . . . . close your eyes and say it together, slowly and let the visions fill your head ~ blueberry mead.  My overactive imagination conjures up fairies to celebrate the union of the two, my knight at my side in a wooded glen sipping from gold goblets ~ encrusted with jewels, of course.

I am in good company when considering the simple bliss of blueberries. Even Robert Frost seemed to be taken in with their magic. . . “The blue’s but a mist from the breath of the wind . . . ”  It seems that Robert and I have something in common. Blueberries = bliss.

Blueberries
by Robert Frost
“You ought to have seen what I saw on my way
To the village, through Mortenson’s pasture to-day:
Blueberries as big as the end of your thumb,
Real sky-blue, and heavy, and ready to drum
In the cavernous pail of the first one to come!
And all ripe together, not some of them green
And some of them ripe! You ought to have seen!”
“I don’t know what part of the pasture you mean.”
“You know where they cut off the woods–let me see–
It was two years ago–or no!–can it be
No longer than that?–and the following fall
The fire ran and burned it all up but the wall.”
“Why, there hasn’t been time for the bushes to grow.
That’s always the way with the blueberries, though:
There may not have been the ghost of a sign
Of them anywhere under the shade of the pine,
But get the pine out of the way, you may burn
The pasture all over until not a fern
Or grass-blade is left, not to mention a stick,
And presto, they’re up all around you as thick
And hard to explain as a conjuror’s trick.”
“It must be on charcoal they fatten their fruit.
I taste in them sometimes the flavour of soot.
And after all really they’re ebony skinned:
The blue’s but a mist from the breath of the wind,
A tarnish that goes at a touch of the hand,
And less than the tan with which pickers are tanned.”
“Does Mortenson know what he has, do you think?”
“He may and not care and so leave the chewink
To gather them for him–you know what he is.
He won’t make the fact that they’re rightfully his
An excuse for keeping us other folk out.”
“I wonder you didn’t see Loren about.”
“The best of it was that I did. Do you know,
I was just getting through what the field had to show
And over the wall and into the road,
When who should come by, with a democrat-load
Of all the young chattering Lorens alive,
But Loren, the fatherly, out for a drive.”
“He saw you, then? What did he do? Did he frown?”
“He just kept nodding his head up and down.
You know how politely he always goes by.
But he thought a big thought–I could tell by his eye–
Which being expressed, might be this in effect:
‘I have left those there berries, I shrewdly suspect,
To ripen too long. I am greatly to blame.'”
“He’s a thriftier person than some I could name.”
“He seems to be thrifty; and hasn’t he need,
With the mouths of all those young Lorens to feed?
He has brought them all up on wild berries, they say,
Like birds. They store a great many away.
They eat them the year round, and those they don’t eat
They sell in the store and buy shoes for their feet.”
“Who cares what they say? It’s a nice way to live,
Just taking what Nature is willing to give,
Not forcing her hand with harrow and plow.”
“I wish you had seen his perpetual bow–
And the air of the youngsters! Not one of them turned,
And they looked so solemn-absurdly concerned.”
“I wish I knew half what the flock of them know
Of where all the berries and other things grow,
Cranberries in bogs and raspberries on top
Of the boulder-strewn mountain, and when they will crop.
I met them one day and each had a flower
Stuck into his berries as fresh as a shower;
Some strange kind–they told me it hadn’t a name.”
“I’ve told you how once not long after we came,
I almost provoked poor Loren to mirth
By going to him of all people on earth
To ask if he knew any fruit to be had
For the picking. The rascal, he said he’d be glad
To tell if he knew. But the year had been bad.
There had been some berries–but those were all gone.
He didn’t say where they had been. He went on:
‘I’m sure–I’m sure’–as polite as could be.
He spoke to his wife in the door, ‘Let me see,
Mame, we don’t know any good berrying place?’
It was all he could do to keep a straight face.
“If he thinks all the fruit that grows wild is for him,
He’ll find he’s mistaken. See here, for a whim,
We’ll pick in the Mortensons’ pasture this year.
We’ll go in the morning, that is, if it’s clear,
And the sun shines out warm: the vines must be wet.
It’s so long since I picked I almost forget
How we used to pick berries: we took one look round,
Then sank out of sight like trolls underground,
And saw nothing more of each other, or heard,
Unless when you said I was keeping a bird
Away from its nest, and I said it was you.
‘Well, one of us is.’ For complaining it flew
Around and around us. And then for a while
We picked, till I feared you had wandered a mile,
And I thought I had lost you. I lifted a shout
Too loud for the distance you were, it turned out,
For when you made answer, your voice was as low
As talking–you stood up beside me, you know.”
“We sha’n’t have the place to ourselves to enjoy–
Not likely, when all the young Lorens deploy.
They’ll be there to-morrow, or even to-night.
They won’t be too friendly–they may be polite–
To people they look on as having no right
To pick where they’re picking. But we won’t complain.
You ought to have seen how it looked in the rain,
The fruit mixed with water in layers of leaves,
Like two kinds of jewels, a vision for thieves.”

The Crazy Lady Has Left the Building

The past eleven months have been a fabulous, frightening, blissified, roller coaster ride for me and my three kid-lings. I went a little crazy last August (according to some) and sold my house in the Southern California desert (a town 15 minutes from the Mexican border and the epicenter for the 2010 Easter 7.2 earthquake).

and packed all of our earthly belongings into a HUGE Budget truck.

The kids and I and a wonderful friend loaded 2 dogs, 5 cats and 2 ferrets into the van, cashed out my retirement, crossed our fingers, took a deep breath and headed east to Vermont. We were headed to a town I’d never seen before. A town where I had no job, no job prospects, no home, no nothing. We did, however, have our sense of humor and hope.

We arrived and within a week rented a farmhouse built around 1860 from the most wonderful landlord/lady. They exude such warm, positive energy and even lowered the rent so that I could have the house. They said that I needed to be in this house ~ this house with a stained glass window in a quiet neighborhood at the top of a hill where I can grow raspberries and hydrangeas and listen to the crows argue with the blue jays.

I am learning about transitions and learning that I must embrace them. We’ve experienced our first year of seasons ~  Mother Earth cycling from the hyperactive exuberance of spring to the deathlike, calm of winter.

I have been dealing with my own physical transition into the next phase of my life as I turn 50. I am also dealing with the emotional transition of being a mom who has home schooled her children for the last 20 years and now see two of them off to high school and the oldest off to college.  There is also the emotional transition of becoming the parent of three children who have stepped into the early years of their adulthood and now know everything about everything.

I am transitioning from a worrier with chaotic thoughts and to-do lists that never get done to someone who seeks stillness. I am learning to listen to those   Goddess whispers that I have so often ignored.

I am doing my best to move from being a cautious spiritual soul to someone who is learning to trust the wisdom and guidance of the Universe for all that we need. I am transitioning from a life lived externally to one that is focused on the me that is inside, my core, my passion and purpose, my writing.

I am learning that transitions are part of life and that Vermont may not be a forever thing, but for now it is my bliss.

Do what you love.

Know your own bone;

gnaw at it, bury it, unearth it, and gnaw it still.

~ Henry David Thoreau~